Gardening

Mediterranean gardens


The Mediterranean garden


They have rich, colorful and prolonged blooms, they withstand the heat and often also the dryness of the summer months, they love the direct sun, they do not need much care: they are the plants of the Mediterranean garden; very suitable to create a particular corner in the garden, often unfortunately they suffer a little from the cold, but in areas with very cold winters they can be cultivated in a container, so that they can be moved to a sheltered place in the cold months.

Plants typical of the Mediterranean basin


These plants originate in the countries bordering the Mediterranean, and can often be seen in the natural vegetation, such as broom, caper, myrtle; other plants come from more distant areas, but are now completely naturalized, such as the prickly pear or the American agave, which are predominant elements of the landscape in many hot areas of Italy, Spain and northern Africa.
They are very widespread and are characterized by similar cultivation requirements: generally they stand a few degrees below zero, they prefer warm climates and need, with the exception of some cases, scarce or no watering; almost all love the arid and sunny areas, typical of southern Italy and neighboring countries.
















































































olive



Oleander



arbutus



Euphorbia
caracias



Chestnut



Hawthorn



Pine tree
Aleppo



Pine tree
maritime



Caper



FIG



Broom



Myrtle



Mesembriantemo



I'm in



Heather



Mastic



Arrowwood



Tree
of Judah



Pomegranate



Narcissus



Privet



Oak tree



Rosemary


Lavender

thyme

Sage

Plants common in the Mediterranean area


In the Mediterranean scrub we can also notice plants that have now become common, even though they come from other areas of the world, often very distant.

Mediterranean Gardens: Plants from other continents


In Mediterranean garden for some years also plants that have in common with the autochthonous ones the preference for sunny places and for hot summers, but which require slightly different cultivation treatments, coming from Australia, China or New Zealand, sometimes from areas in which the precipitations are greater than those found at our latitudes. These plants often find their way into a Mediterranean garden because they share many characteristics with the plants listed above, including the abundant summer flowering, the need to be covered in the cold climate in winter and also the ease of cultivation; in any case, although not, especially in some cases, widespread in cultivation, they are not yet completely "integrated" in the Mediterranean flora and there are no native species or spontaneously developed ones: we can only see them in the gardens.